Online firm monitors your item, deals with buyers

Written by Editor

Thursday, 05 February 2009 09:33 February 5, 2009
By DAVID SHAROS For The Sun
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The eBay Web site is among the most popular on the Internet. A few weeks ago on Black Friday, it was the most-visited site on the Web with an estimated 12 million hits. But for some of us, selling our used goods and house wares via the Internet just takes too much time.

A new Naperville business, which opened in late September, stands ready to help those legions of eBay users out. On Sept. 29, iSold It — a new online selling service offering consumers an easy way to sell items on eBay or other online marketplaces — opened its doors in Naperville. The store is the second for the company. Its Orland Park location opened almost two years ago.

Store owner Eric Czerwonka, 29, said that as a University of Wisconsin undergrad, he tinkered with the Internet before going in a different career direction, but has now returned to his “roots.”

“While I was in college, I did some work helping people with Web pages and posting stuff on the Web, but after graduating, I went to work for about four to five years in insurance,” Czerwonka said. “I decided to move on from that and get into this business.”

The iSold It concept essentially works as a middle man between the seller and eBay. Czerwonka said many folks don’t have time to monitor the eBay sale and respond to bids, and also are reluctant about using credits cards online or risking other issues related to identity theft.

“Most people bring in their items to the store, and we get to look them over,” he said. “People don’t need an appointment. For the most part, we assume the items are what people say they are, and studies have shown that since people are buying those items from a store like ours and not an independent seller, the items are generally worth more.”

Czerwonka said in addition to the eBay selling fee, the store charges 33 percent of the final selling price for its services but that most customers make all of that back. Big sellers, he said, have included things such as designer and brand-name items, which often don’t go on sale. Clothes, baseball cards and comic books are among the slowest in terms of consumer interest.

“Because we often get more for goods, it offsets the fees people have to pay,” he said. “There’s also the issue of convenience, since we ship the items out and we handle any questions about the sale. Most online consignment businesses offer about a 50-50 split — ours is more like 55-45, 55% in the customer’s favor.”

Czerwonka said that currently, eBay has about 100 million registered users and believes his business will not fall victim to the problems faced by many of the so-called “dot-coms” that went under in the past decade.

“We’re selling anywhere from 300 to 500 items a month for people, and we’ve opened a second store,” he said. “With all the eBay users out there, and it being one of the No. 1 Web sites, we’re pretty confident our service should be needed for a long time to come.”

iSold It
  • Where: 4931 S. Route 59, No. 117, Naperville
  • Hours: 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Friday; 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday.; closed Sunday
  • Call: 630-717-0615
  • Online: www.napervilleebay.com